Why You Need To Hire Job Candidates With These Three “Weaknesses”

Why You Need To Hire Job Candidates With These Three “Weaknesses”

BY TOMAS CHAMORRO-PREMUZIC
[COURTESY OF FASTCOMPANY.COM]

One personality expert says hiring managers need to stop downplaying candidates’ flaws.

Facebook’s Head of People told Fast Company last week that her team of recruiters works hard to uncover candidates’ strengths. Most companies try to do much the same. They assess the qualities and skills they believe job performance depends on, and they design interviews to test whether candidates are likely to display those qualities once on the job.

This isn’t exactly a mistake, but it’s only part of the puzzle. Everyone has weaknesses and drawbacks that they’ll invariably bring with them, too. What hiring managers usually do is just try to decide whether a candidate’s strengths will outweigh those detriments.

But what they don’t often do is systematically determine which types of “personality flaws” they’d rather have on their teams. After all, some are a lot worse than others, and some can even be assets under the right circumstances.

WHAT YOU WANT VS. WHAT YOU’LL GET

There are millions of different jobs, and each company has its own culture, so what employers actually want in job candidates varies widely. But personality research suggests that all strong candidates tend to look rather similar, in the sense that there’s a limited number of attributes that make them strong: They’re generally more rewarding to deal with, more capable, and more willing to work hard than others are. Employers may use many different names for what they want–grit, adaptability, emotional intelligence, entrepreneurialism–but what they always need is ability, likability, and drive. You can ride those qualities to the bank any day of the week.

But while these three competencies predict future job performance and career success with remarkable accuracy, they don’t tell the full story about a candidate’s potential. In fact, no matter how attractive a candidate’s “bright side” may be, they’ll always have a “dark side,” too–a set of undesirable or counterproductive traits that hinder their ability to work well, mostly because of their disruptive effects on others.

But while these three competencies predict future job performance and career success with remarkable accuracy, they don’t tell the full story about a candidate’s potential. In fact, no matter how attractive a candidate’s “bright side” may be, they’ll always have a “dark side,” too–a set of undesirable or counterproductive traits that hinder their ability to work weHiring managers tend to focus on attributes that predict positive career outcomes–like teamwork, engagement, performance, and leadership skills–and neglect the ones that predict derailment and failure: coasting, underperformance, antisocial behaviors, and the like. But whenever you hire somebody, they’re bringing a combination of these qualities with them through the door every single time. And your standard “What’s your biggest weakness?” job-interview question isn’t enough to help you assess the total package.l, mostly because of their disruptive effects on others.

More often than not, questions like that are simply meant to evaluate candidates’ social skills and preparation; they’re basically an invitation to fake modesty or disguise additional strengths as weaknesses. Asked about her worst habit or character trait, an astute candidate will confess to being “a perfectionist,” “too altruistic,” or “too humble.” Then she’ll deliver a handy anecdote pretending that those qualities aren’t actually valuable in most workplaces–which astute interviewers know they often are.

Just think what would happen if a candidate answered by candidly listing their real faults, like being lazy, grumpy, selfish, or dim. At best, they might earn points (or even sympathy) for bold-faced honesty, but their chances of landing the job would fall to zero on the spot. Most people would wisely decline an invitation to hang themselves, but employers would assume no responsibility for those brazen or foolish enough to accept it. In practice, asking about weaknesses is just an easy way to eliminate some candidates without having to think too hard.

Yet none of this changes the fact that certain weaknesses are preferable to others. So if you want to assess the whole person and make sure you hire people with the best overall personality profiles, you can’t pretend they’re flawless. Instead, you need to look–intentionally–for the least problematic weaknesses a candidate might have. Here are three of them:

1. CONFORMISM

We live in a world that celebrates “originals” and rule-breakers, but no organization (or society) could function if such individuals made up the majority. In fact, any collective system requires the bulk of its people to follow rules and norms, and employers know this.

While many companies say they need innovators and disruptors, what they truly require is people who will do what they’re told. As Susan Cain recently pointed out in the Times, this isn’t a bad thing; “followership” is a skill set we need just as badly as leadership. (“Perhaps the biggest disservice done by the outsize glorification of ‘leadership skills,’” she adds, “is to the practice of leadership itself . . . It attracts those who are motivated by the spotlight rather than by the ideas and people they serve.”) And yet you’ll find no job listing out there that includes terms like “obedient” or “dutiful,” except perhaps in the military.

Still, a great deal of psychological research suggests that rule-bound and conscientious individuals tend to perform better–even when they are leaders (presumably because they can still please their own bosses). As I show in my latest book, a large number of bosses would rather promote obedient and easygoing employees than talented but difficult ones. And in fact, many actually do.

2. ATTENTION-SEEKING

We might be fascinated by narcissists, but the common view is that great employees and leaders let their achievements speak for themselves. If two people are equally talented or productive, most of us would say that we’d rather work with the one who avoids self-promotion and seems humble and modest.

Yet meta-analytic studies show that attention-seeking individuals emerge more often as leaders, and they’re often perceived as more effective once they do, according to 360-degree feedback data. The danger, of course, is that many attention-seeking job candidates may also be narcissistic, so the best-case scenario is someone who enjoys performing and being the center of attention but isn’t actually self-obsessed or entitled.

In other words, it isn’t always a bad thing to hire an altruistic exhibitionist–a selfless clown.

3. (A DOSE OF) DISHONESTY

Make no mistake: Pathological dishonesty is harmful, particularly when coupled with low integrity. You don’t want to give a job to a lowdown liar.

But dishonesty isn’t a categorical evil in practice. Not only is it minimally problematic in small doses, but most of us know how it can even be useful, as the phrase “white lie” indicates. People who are brutally honest straight-talkers may even struggle more in their careers than those who are able to fake it–within reason–particularly if they seem authentic in the process.

That may not sit well with you, but there’s research to suggest, additionally, that dishonest people tend to be more creative (perhaps because lying requires creativity and imagination). So if you’re hiring someone for a creative role, there’s a better chance you’ll be interviewing candidates who are adept at bending the truth. But most of them probably won’t be doing it maliciously. After all, the premise that we should “just be ourselves” is both naïve and foolish given what we know of human psychology.

Behaviorally, full authenticity describes acting without inhibitions or constraints, as we do when we’re partying with our friends–not a great formula for the workplace. The ideal employee is capable of exercising diplomacy and adhering to social etiquette, and this inevitably requires being at least somewhat dishonest: telling people that they’ve done well when they haven’t (especially if they’ve tried hard); telling your boss she had a great idea when in fact she didn’t; making a client feel like the most important person in the world when they’re actually really irritating.

So don’t stop looking for candidates’ strengths. If you are lucky enough to attract employees who are able, likable, and driven, just make sure that they have the best possible flaws. Sometimes a dose of dishonesty, attention-seeking, and conformism may be the most tolerable defects you can ask for.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic is an international authority in psychological profiling, people analytics, and talent management.

Reasons to Use Social Media in Your Job Search

By Catherine Conlan

[Courtesy of Monster.com]

Reasons to Use Social Media in Your Job Search

Using social media is a great way to boost your job search. Taking advantage of social media sites can help you get your name out there and find the job you’re looking for.

Here are four reasons to use social media in your job search.

You Can Become an Expert

Demonstrating a deeper knowledge about the industry you’re in — or would like to be in — through blogging builds your credibility, says Lisa Parkin, CEO of social media consultancy Social Climber. “Whether it’s on a personal website or on a dedicated blog about the industry they’re seeking employment in, job hunters can show potential employers their knowledge and skill sets by writing about a news event or relevant topic once or twice a week.”

It Shows You’re Not Afraid of Technology

You don’t have to be an expert, but having a social media presence shows you care about your professional reputation and you’re comfortable using technology, says Brie Weiler Reynolds, director of online content at FlexJobs.

Pinterest is a good site to try something innovative with your job search, she says. “Create a board for your resume where you pin pictures of your work experience and education such as pictures of the college you attended, the companies you’ve worked for, and so on. Pinterest is especially interesting because it helps you create a visual out of your resume, which is traditionally a text document.”

You Can Blog Your Way to a Job

Commenting on the issues in your industry or field of work can itself be a path to a new job. Michelle Bramer, marketing and PR manager for online advertising firm eZanga.com, says blogs are an excellent resource for job candidates looking for new opportunities. And linking back to your blog while posting on other sites can lead recruiters right to your virtual door.

“Some of my favorite bloggers are small companies, and surprisingly, many of them are always looking for marketing and sales support,” Bramer says. If you’ve blogged about a company before, it can help strengthen your pitch when you apply there. As someone who routinely manages content writers and PR specialists, she says, “some of our best writers have been found by forging a relationship on a social network.”

You Can Learn About a Company’s Culture

Social media can go both ways — you can tell hiring managers about yourself, but you can also use it to learn about companies you’re interested in. Following a company on social media can give you an inside look into a its culture, clients and work, says Lauren Maiman, owner of the Midnight Oil Group.

“Use that info to your advantage when it comes to a cover letter or interview,” she says. “Use this insight to make sure you mesh with and want to be a part of their team. If you’re connecting in a meaningful way with them on social media, by the time you get to the interview, they should feel like they already know you (so careful what info you put out there, too).”

Skills Recent Graduates Bring to the Workforce

by Ed Kavanagh

[Courtesy of www.thestaffingstream.com]

Skills Recent Graduates Bring to the Workforce

While May still seems far away, graduation season is fast approaching. So, do not be surprised if you soon see an influx in applications from college graduates as graduates are beginning to look for employment opportunities earlier and earlier. As an entirely new class of graduates seeks positions, companies can expect entirely new skillsets to enter the workforce.
A blurry line separates Millennials and Generation Z, but there is no doubt each group brings distinct sensibilities to the workplace. For example, Gen Z grew up during an economic downturn, watching their parents struggle to keep jobs and witnessing global instability via war and terror. This backdrop created a more money-cautious and pragmatic generation, a stark contrast to the typically optimistic and risk-seeking Millennials. As a result, Gen Z is eager to begin working, especially because they understand the volatility of the job market.
As Gen Z gets thrown into the professional mix with Baby Boomers, Gen X and Millennials, Addison Group shares some of the skills they will bring to the table:

• Social media savvy: The importance of social media is growing in every industry, and it’s long been a critical element of the recruiting process. Studies show that not only are 80 percent of Gen Z on social media daily, but also that same percentage consider creative self-expression important. Take advantage of these new workers’ fluency in the fast-changing landscape of social media and their ability to act as influencers to their peers. It could lead to increased intelligence within your digital or social teams internally and recruiting opportunities or brand reputation externally.

• Entrepreneurial spirit: Starting at a younger age, Gen Z desires to work independently, contribute to future technologies and make the world a better place via innovation. In fact, 72 percent of high school students said they want to start a business someday, and another 40 percent believe they will invent something that changes the world. Employers can take advantage of this entrepreneurial drive by encouraging newly graduated employees to work independently and contribute constructive criticism or new ideas that company veterans may be too engrained in the organization to see.

• Diversity and global awareness: A Ford study found that 58 percent of adults ages 35-plus worldwide agree that kids today have more in common with their global peers than they do with adults in their own country. Gen Z graduates will not only look for companies that contain a diverse set of employees, but they will feel comfortable functioning in a global corporate environment. From day one, offer these new hires a chance to work with your global offices, clients or partners. They will likely thrive in this setting and could open doors to more global opportunities.

• Money is not the motivator: Only 28 percent of Gen Z said money would motivate them to work harder and stay with their employer longer; this is a significantly smaller percentage compared to 42 percent of Gen Y. What does this mean for your company? You’ll attract talent based on passion rather than compensation. Use this to your advantage while recruiting, highlighting some of the community involvement and mission based work of your clients. Typically, people who are passionate about their company will do good work.

There is no doubt that integrating new generations into the workforce comes with new challenges, such as how to foster inter-generational collaboration. For example, older generations may find it difficult to work with new hires who embrace complicated technologies, or younger generations may not understand why seasoned professionals favor those with advanced degrees. However, the best way to prepare for these changes requires identifying the areas where newcomers will thrive and determining clear opportunities to capitalize on those skills.

3 Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm in your Job Search

By Debra Auerbach

[Courtesy of Career Builder.com]

3 Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm In Your Job Search

THREE KEY ADVANTAGES OF USING A STAFFING FIRM ARE EXPERIENCE, INSIGHTS AND CONFIDENTIAL OPPORTUNITIES.

Sometimes a job search can feel isolating. You’re spending hours upon hours searching for opportunities, working on your resume and applying to job openings, often without having any outside feedback about what you’re doing right or wrong. That isolation can add a lot of emotional stress to an already nerve-wracking experience.

What you may not realize is that you don’t have to go it alone. “Psychologists tell us that next to death of a spouse, death of a child and death of a parent, the fourth most emotional experience we have, coupled with divorce, is searching for a job. It is emotionally stressful,” says Tony Beshara, owner and president of Babich & Associates, the oldest placement and recruitment service in Texas. “A professional staffing firm can help eliminate that emotional stress. Staffing firms are in the trenches on a daily basis with candidates and employers.”

Beshara says the three key advantages of using a staffing firm are experience, insights and confidential opportunities. Read on to learn more about these benefits and how staffing firms can play a crucial role in helping you find your next career:

1. Experience 

According to Beshara, the average U.S. professional changes jobs every two and a half to three years. So that means a worker may go a long stretch of time before needing to engage in a job search. Staffing firm recruiters, on the other hand, live and breathe the job-search process daily.

Beshara points out that within the period of time between job searches, the job market can change – sometimes drastically. “The staffing professional is current on exactly what is going on in the immediate market. They have a unique perspective that the job seeker will not have. The market for a particular skill or experience is never the same as it was three years ago. It isn’t likely any job candidate is going to be aware of that change. So, the ‘new’ candidate may think that finding a job is going to be like ‘last time,’ but it’s not.”

A knowledgeable staffing professional can help navigate a job seeker through the market changes, so the job seeker is less likely to encounter any surprises or challenges along the way. “The experienced staffing pro doesn’t give theoretical or abstract advice, but practical ‘this is the way it is … this is what you should expect … this is what we should do’ advice,” Beshara says.

2. Insights 

One of the often frustrating parts about job searching is not getting any feedback from employers as to why you aren’t the right fit for a role. When working with a staffing firm, you get access to that kind of information, which can help improve your search now and down the line.

“Staffing professionals have insights that candidates can’t get anywhere else,” Beshara says. “Since the majority of us work the same clients and the same hiring mangers over many years, we know what they like and how they like it, what they will hire and what they won’t. Since we get to know them personally, we not only understand the job they are trying to fill but we know their personalities and personal likes and dislikes. We give those insights to our candidates to be sure both parties have the best chance of success not in just getting a job, but [in having] a long, solid employment relationship.”

3. Confidential opportunities 

According to a 2014 study conducted by CareerBuilder and Inavero, the attribute job seekers value the most in staffing sales representatives or recruiters is that they can find opportunities job seekers wouldn’t be able to find themselves. Not only is that because staffing professionals are skilled at knowing which jobs might be the right fit, but it’s also because they are privy to opportunities that job seekers wouldn’t normally have access to.

“Because our clients trust us, they come to us with confidential job opportunities before they go to the general market,” Beshara says. “We have access to the ‘hidden’ job market. Hiring authorities will often ask us to fill positions that even people in their own organization don’t know about.”

Sometimes, there doesn’t even need to be a job opening for a staffing firm to get you a job. “Again, because of trust and insight, we know the kinds of employers that are interested in certain types of experience, whether or not they are ‘actively looking’ for a candidate,” Beshara notes. “One-third of the positions we fill don’t exist before we call a hiring authority representing a candidate we know they would be interested in speaking with. Employers will hire exceptional candidates when they come along even if they don’t have a formal opening. A good staffing professional knows his or her hiring authorities well enough to know the kind of candidate they’d be interested in even if they aren’t formally ‘looking.'”

Your Ultimate Interview Prep Checklist

[Courtesy of Glassdoor.com]
So you applied for a job online, and just got a call from the recruiter asking if you can interview with the hiring manager. You are super excited until you hear that the interview is happening in 48 hours. 2 days. OMG!

Don’t panic; just prepare.  Complete with timing and strategy, we’ve complied a comprehensive list of essential ways to gear up for your interview and knock it out of the park. Ready, set, prep!

As soon as you hang up with the recruiter:

1. Study for your interview like it’s a final exam.

• Find as much information as you can on the company or organization, and commit as much of it to memory as possible.
• If the job you’re interviewing for requires knowledge in a certain field, do all the learning and brushing up you can on information that will be relevant to your interview.

2. Generate a list of potential interview questions (and their answers!) beforehand.

• Base your list of questions on both what you expect them to ask and the real-life experience of others
• Reach out to people who worked in similar companies and positions as you are interviewing for and ask them about their interview experience
• Use tools like Glassdoor’s interview question database to look up real interview questions and their answers.

36 hours before the interview:

3. Write out answers to every question you anticipate, and practice delivering them out loud.

• Even if you don’t remember your responses word for word, you can fall back on certain key points and phrases.
• Write your own list of questions for the interviewer, and be prepared to ask them when the time arises.
• Make sure your questions are nuanced and well-researched. Never ask for any information that can be simply found online.

4. Compare your skills and experience to the job description.

• For each component of the job description, brainstorm your relevant skills and experiences, and think critically about how you want to present them.
• If there’s a preferred skill or experience you do not have, be able to demonstrate you’ll be competent without it.

12-24 hours before the interview:

5. Be rested and healthy for the big day.• Before getting good night’s sleep, try to imagine yourself acing the interview.
• Eat wholesome, healthy meals for the days preceding the interview.
• If you are prone to anxiety, try breathing techniques or meditation the morning of the interview, and even directly before.

3-6 hours before the interview:

6. Dress for success

• Keep your fashion choices subdued and classic – don’t wear clothes that will distract the interviewer.
• If you’re unclear on what type of clothes to wear, don’t be afraid to reach out to your interviewer and ask.
• Wear clothes you feel confident in. Don’t be afraid to invest in an “interview outfit” or two that you feel your best in.

7. Empower yourself

• Practice a firm handshake, strong posture, and attentive body language in advance.
• Think of a mantra you can call upon for self-confidence, like, “no matter what, I will do my best.”
• Try to imagine yourself not getting the job. While it might be painful to think about, what can you see yourself having learned from the interview experience?

8. Don’t leave any unnecessary unknowns.

• Plan what to bring (extra copies of your resume!) and even what transportation you are taking to the interview way in advance, so there’s no added uncertainty the day of.

During the interview:

9. Keep an interview journal

• During or even after your interview is over, take a few minutes to jot down what parts you felt you aced, and where you could have shone brighter. These notes can serve as a valuable guide for your future interviews.

6-12 hours after the interview:

10. Follow up.

• Extending the conversation shows that you’re passionate about the job. Don’t call every day asking if you got the job, but a simple thank you note can speak volumes about your commitment to the position.
• And if you didn’t get the job? Let them know if you’re still interested, and ask what you can do to be a more attractive candidate in the future.

The #1 Secret to Better Hiring in 2017

[Courtesy of Murray Resources]

The #1 Secret to Better Hiring in 2017

Hiring is now a whole lot harder for employers and easier for candidates. Unemployment is at 4.2% in Tyler. So, it’s not a buyer’s market anymore and candidates have more opportunities to consider. As a hiring manager or employer, what can you do? The answer’s easier than you might think: bring in the experts.

Here’s how a staffing agency can help you:

#1: They have in-depth knowledge of the candidate market.
While you might only hire a few times a year, recruiters at staffing agencies are constantly networking, sourcing candidates and hiring them – all year round. As a result, they know what kind of talent is available, how to best attract and recruit the best professionals, and what competitive compensation you should be offering them. This insight and information will help you recruit better candidates, faster.

#2: They can recruit hard-to-find or specialized talent.
Hiring today is challenging enough. But when it comes to a demanding position that requires hard-to-find skills, it can seem almost impossible to fill. But recruiters at a staffing agency know how to source active and passive candidates who are more selective about opportunities. They spend a lot of time recruiting top talent, including those with specialized skills, so you can leverage their network to find people with the background you need.

#3: They can speed up the hiring process.
When you’re inundated with resumes and cover letters, it can be hard to properly screen every candidate and also get your daily work done. But a recruiter at a staffing agency is trained to screen resumes and hone in on the skills you’re looking for. Not only that, but they can conduct phone screens and interviews to further qualify candidates. That way, the candidates you do end up seeing are those who are all a good fit for the job you’re offering.

#4: They can help you create a strong employer brand.
Your reputation in the candidate marketplace can have a big impact on the quality of talent you’re able to attract. A good staffing agency partner can help you develop an appealing employer brand. They’ll know where to advertise your company and openings, and how to position you as an employer of choice, including what it’s like to work at your organization, including culture, as well as perks and benefits.

If you need to hire – but are hard-pressed for time or resources – consider outsourcing the recruiting process to professionals who do it all day. You can benefit from the reach, network, and proven processes of a trusted staffing agency partner.

6 Easy Ways to Update Your Resume

Courtesy of Murray Resources

6 Easy Ways to Update Your Resume

You want to find a new job. But when’s the last time you looked at your resume?

If the answer is “a few years ago,” or worse, “I don’t remember,” then you have some work to do before you can submit it to potential employers. A great resume is like a ticket into the interview process. And if you don’t have one, then you’re going to miss out on top opportunities.

To help you in the process, here are six easy ways to update your resume:

#1: Think about goals.

While your resume gives an overview of your career history, it should also be about future goals. That means when you’re thinking about what to highlight, consider it through the lens of where you want to go in your career. If job duties at a past position don’t align with future career goals, then don’t put a lot of emphasis on them. Concentrate your attention, instead, on the experiences and credentials that relate to your current career objectives.

#2: Eliminate the objective.

Unless you’re changing careers, get rid of the objective, or make it very short. This simply takes up valuable space without offering a lot of return. Instead, replace it with a summary of qualifications that offers a few key highlights of your professional career.

#3: Focus on the “wow” factor.

The strongest resumes promote results, not just duties and responsibilities. Some questions to ask yourself to find your “wow” factor for each position include:

  • What have you been best at in past positions?
  • What accomplishment(s) are you most proud of?
  • Which achievements can you back up with numbers, dollars, and percentages?
  • What information would make a hiring manager want to call you in for an interview?

#4: Refresh the look.

Most hiring managers scan resumes. So make yours easy to quickly skim. Use bolded job titles and three to four bullet points under each. Also, don’t use a tiny point size for your font; 11 or 12 are standard. In addition, make sure there’s plenty of spacing so your resume doesn’t look cramped.

#5: Update your contact information.

If you just have your name and address, it’s time for an update. Your cell phone number and email, as well as a link to your LinkedIn profile, should be front and center instead.

#6: Use keywords.

Most companies today use an applicant tracking system to find candidates. So if you don’t use keywords from the job posting, you could get filtered out – even if you’re the right fit.

Top 7 Mistakes on Your First Day of Work That Make You Seem Inexperienced

Remember… first impressions matter!!

from “THE INC. LIFE

Certain actions can give off the impression that you’re less competent than you really are.

brelsfordpersonneltop7mistakesonyourfirstdayofworkthatmakeyouseeminexperiencedpetereconomy
Peter Economy

brelsfordpersonneltop7mistakesonyourfirstdayofworkthatmakeyouseeminexperienced
CREDIT: Getty Images

Even though we all have first-day jitters, there are some things that we can do that make us seem more experienced than not. Regardless of how prepared you are for the role, certain actions can give off the impression that you’re less competent than you really are. What are the things that make you seem inexperienced on the first day of your new job? Check out the top 7 here.

1) Going out the night before

If you’ve been out and about the night before, it always shows. You’ll be less attentive, alert, and able to respond. Don’t risk one night of fun for a potential career–even if you think it doesn’t, it’ll show.

2) Jumping in before you’re ready

Even if you think you can, don’t embark on a task without making sure you completely understand the instructions, and that you’ll be able to execute what your boss is asking for. Otherwise, he or she might think that you’re unable to exceed the expectations they had in mind.

3) Dressing incorrectly

Whether it’s overly dressing up or down, the way that you present yourself your first day immediately shows whether or not you’ll be able to fit in at the office. Make sure that you know what kind of image the company is trying to project of itself, and dress your part.

4) Being negative

Before the rest of the office knows how eager and positive your demeanor may normally be, showing a different kind of attitude the first day of work definitely leaves a negative impression. Take care not to be negative, or to avoid any kind of complaining while you’re going about your first day.

5) Acting overeager

Even if you are enthusiastic, there’s something we all dislike about the person that tries too hard. Show that you’re able to complete everything the company asks and demands of you, but don’t go too overboard.

6) Not admitting your mistakes

Even though we all are sure to make mistakes when we just start somewhere, being able to own up to them and amend for them correctly is an important skill that only the most professional of employees possess. Don’t make the rookie mistake, and own up to them too.

7) Talking trash

There’s nothing someone dislikes more than someone who runs their mouth at any chance they get. Don’t be that person in the office. And definitely don’t be that person on the first day.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

PUBLISHED ON: APR 20, 2017

https://www.inc.com/peter-economy/top-7-mistakes-on-your-first-day-of-work-that-make-you-seem-inexperienced.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+home%2Fupdates+%28Inc.com%29

Energy Jobs are Coming Back to Texas

Comment by Wayne Christian, Texas Railroad Commissioner

March 27, 2017

The Tyler Area Energy Summit was held on March 27, 2017. It was hosted by the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce Energy Committee, along with a number of sponsors. With a new energy-friendly presidential administration and rising petroleum prices, the oil and gas industry is set for a rebound, speakers at the 2017 Energy Summit told a packed audience.

Texas Railroad Commissioner Wayne Christian noted, “We’re about to see the biggest economic boom we’ve ever seen because of the new administration. God has blessed Texas. Energy jobs are coming back to Texas.”

Ken Morgan, PhD., director of the Texas Christian University’s Energy Institute, added a global perspective. The U.S. oil and gas industry is poised to rebound, Morgan said. And, it has a good story to tell – about how inexpensive energy improves lives enormously, in multiple ways.

Link to the CBS 19 Energy Summit story, and Chairman Christian’s comments:

http://www.cbs19.tv/news/local/tyler-area-oil-and-energy-summit/425996376

Link to the Tyler Morning Telegraph Energy Summit story:

http://www.tylerpaper.com/TP-News+Local/276500/oil-and-gas-industry-has-an-image-problem-tyler-area-energy-summit-speakers-agree

We are very excited to launch and share our new web site with you!

We are very excited to launch and share our new web site with you! Whether you are a candidate considering a career move, or a company in search of top talent, we are grateful that you are exploring our site. Thank you for interest in Brelsford Personnel!

We truly love what we do and find it as fulfilling today as it was in the early days–many, many moons ago! Helping people realize their professional goals, and companies find their perfect employee, remain a joyful experience to all of us at Brelsford Personnel.

So check back often for updates on our current positions and blog posts.

You are always welcome!