5 Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

[Courtesy of LinkedIn.com]

5 Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

Everyone agonizes over their resumes. We all worry that if it’s not perfect, we may not get a call from a recruiter. However, when you constantly gather feedback from peers and experts, you may end up making the job search too confusing before you even start.

Ultimately, you only want to consider one thing when you write your resume: the reader. The reader isn’t the evil applicant tracking system that throws out your resume according to some algorithm. The reader is a real, live person. Your task is to make it easy for them to understand what you do and what your accomplishment are in 1-2 pages.

Trust me, I’ve read my share of resumes. In the last four years, I’ve averaged between 20-35 open technical jobs that I was responsible for filling. In each, I selected between 5-10 candidates to interview and put forward. This equated to between 200 and 350 people I spoke to – every week. Not to mention every hiring manager I spoke to as well. Over a year, this equals 16,800 resumes. That’s just the ones that I selected, not counting all the others I declined.

Take it from me: Here are the five things you want to cut from your resume, if you haven’t already:

1. Multiple Fonts
For the most part, recruiters aren’t going to read your whole resume. They’ll look at your title, company, and dates of employment for each job, and then move on.

The human eye is a funny thing. If you have several different fonts on the page, it may mess with the reader’s comprehension. They’ll have to reread certain sections of the resume just to make sure they understand – if you’re lucky, that is. If you aren’t lucky, they will just move on to the next candidate.

Plus, all those fonts are making my eyes hurt. Please stop.

2. ‘References Given Upon Request’
We know they are. We will ask you for references if we decide to give you an offer. This is premature in the relationship. All you’ve done so far was send a cover letter and resume

3. Long, Boring Bullet Points
Here’s a good rule of thumb: If a sixth grader can read your resume and understand what you do for a living, than a non-technical recruiter can, too. The odds that the person reviewing your resume doesn’t fully understand what you do for a living are high. That’s why you want to write punchy bullets with accomplishment statements woven in.

5 Things You Need to Remove from Your Resume In 2017

Use a simple format to present your tasks and achievements quickly. White space is your friend. I promise.

4. Funny or Odd Email Addresses – or Worse, Your Company Email Address
It’s a job search. Be professional. I once had a job seeker list “foxylady@gmail.com” as her email address. After 15 years of doing this work, I still remember it. Enough said.

5. Industry or Company Jargon
The reader has no idea what the “Tiger Team” or the “Eagle Project” were. Be safe and drop anything highly technical and industry- or company-specific – especially acronyms. If you must use such language, spell it out. High-tech companies are known for having special languages that don’t translate to anyone outside of the company. Years ago, I read resumes from candidates who were let go from Intel. It was confusing and time-consuming. They were lucky, because I ended up calling them and asking a lot of questions. Most recruiters won’t do that. They’ll just skip over you entirely.

Job seekers often write too much (and never too little) out of fear. They are afraid if they don’t list every little detail on their resume, they won’t get a call to interview. This approach often backfires. If you put your resume “out there” for 30 days and no one responds, stop sending it out. Chances are what you wrote on your resume works just fine, but you should also know when it’s time to pull the document and refresh it.

 

6 Tips for Staying Sane During Your Job Search

[Courtesy of blog.job.com]

You’ve updated and posted your resume, signed up for job alerts, and have consistently applied to jobs. Yet, you still haven’t landed your #NewJob2017. Don’t dismay. Our internet sources tell us that it takes roughly one month to find a job for every $10,000 of the paycheck you would like to earn. For example, if you were looking for a job that pays $50,000 a year your job search could take 5 months.

Below are some ways to help take away some of your job search pain and put your mind at ease:

1. Take a Break
You don’t want to run the risk of job search burnout. Taking some time away from your job search to focus on things like your family, friends and health will help you appreciate all that’s good in your life in order to help lift your spirits.

2. Simplify Things
If you’re finding it difficult to make time for your job search perhaps you have too much going on in your life. Look to rid yourself of distractions like social media and TV which can suck up your free time fast. Also, see if you can delegate some of your household chores or at least save some for the weekend when you’re not so exhausted.

3. Meditate
Meditation is a tried and true practice of many of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world. From LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner to the incomparable Oprah Winfrey, it is difficult to deny the benefits of meditation. While there are many different methods, studies have shown that meditation can change your brain matter, reduce stress and help you make better decisions.

6 Tips for Staying Sane During Your Job Search

4. Get Outside
“Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air”
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

Sometimes, when you’re in a funk, all you need is just a change of scenery. Sure, winter isn’t the most pleasant of seasons to be outside if you dislike the cold and live in New England (we feel sorry for you) but it’s scientifically proven that being one with nature is an easy way to boost your mental and physical well-being.

5. Get Exercise
Seeing the pattern here? Like being outside, there are endless mental and physical health benefits to getting your move on. Even if it’s just going for a 15-minute stroll, getting your blood flowing is imperative to feeling happy and healthy.

6. Treat Yourself
Just because you need a new job doesn’t mean you have to deprive yourself of happiness. Sure, you may not be able to afford eating out, or clothes shopping, or Netflix even, but you can still find enjoyment in some small things. Life is short and you shouldn’t hang on to the idea that you will cheer up as soon as you get a better gig. By finding peace throughout the rough patches builds character and makes you a stronger you in the end.

6 Tips for Staying Sane During Your Job Search

Are You Making These 5 Common Phone Interview Mistakes?

[Courtesy of MurrayResources.com]

Gone are the days of the initial interview being a face-to-face one. Most employers today first conduct a phone screen. These are usually shorter and less in-depth than a full in-person interview. But they give the employer enough to go on to decide whether a candidate should move forward in the hiring process. We see some candidates make the same common mistakes in phone interviews, which impact their job search success. What are they – and how can you avoid them? Here’s a look:

Are You Making These 5 Common Phone Interview Mistakes

1. Not setting aside a quiet, private time to talk.

When it comes to successful phone interviews, it’s important to schedule them at a time when you can focus and will have total privacy. That means doing phone screens while you’re driving, or while your kids are all at home isn’t a good idea. Nor is it wise to schedule one while you’re at work, sitting at your desk. Keep in mind, if the environment isn’t quiet and distraction-free, you’re not going to be able to focus and provide the best answers.

2. Not preparing.

Just as you would for an in-person interview, it’s important to prepare for a phone screen. That means researching the company ahead of time and developing a list of questions you’d like to ask. That also means reviewing the job postings again ahead of time so it’s fresh in your mind and thinking through how your background and skills are a good fit for the position.

3. Eating and drinking during the interview.

It’s ok to keep a glass of water next to you in case your throat gets dry. But other than that, don’t eat or drink during the interview. Nothing makes a worse impression in a phone screen than the sound of chewing or slurping.

4. Using call waiting during the interview.

If another call comes in during your phone screen, ignore it unless it’s an emergency. You should never put a hiring manager on hold, unless you want to send the message that you don’t really want the job.

5. Talking too much or too little.

It’s up to you to persuade the hiring manager that you’re the best fit for the job. That means providing persuasive answers that showcase your strengths and proven record of success. That does not mean droning on, or giving one-word answers to interview questions. If there’s a pause in the conversation, don’t jump to fill it with mindless chatter. Let the hiring manager take control.

Phone screens are the new interview. So, avoid the mistakes above so you can ace yours – and move onto the next step in the hiring process.

Interest In Side Gigs Escalates, Survey Finds

Recent survey shows that a large percentage of workers, 85%, work more than one job. Is that true for you?

[COURTESY OF STAFFINGINDUSTRY.COM]

INTEREST IN SIDE GIGS ESCALATES, SURVEY FINDS

A large percentage of workers, 85%, hold at least one side gig or secondary source of employment in addition to their primary job, according to a study commissioned by Spherion Staffing. Of that group, more than half, 54%, hold two or more side gigs, extending their skills across multiple roles and fields of work.

Interest In Side Gigs Escalates, Survey Finds

Among workers holding at least one side gig, a desire to supplement their current income and to make money to save for future interests and responsibilities were the most frequently cited reasons for doing so, at 42% and 37% respectively. In particular, 57% of female workers deemed income growth the main inspiration for their side-gig activity, far surpassing the 31% of male workers who said the same.

“The escalating interest in side gigs across the American workforce does not necessarily reflect that workers are unhappy with their job, but rather a desire to pursue new and exciting growth opportunities — be they financial or personal,” said Sandy Mazur, Spherion division president. “Given this growth, side gig flexibility must be taken into account as companies refine their recruitment and retention plans. Employers and employees must find a middle ground that gives workers freedom to explore supplemental opportunities without inhibiting productivity or performance.”

Additional findings from the survey include:

  • Nearly half of workers surveyed, 47%, said that changing societal norms have set the expectation that at least one side gig is necessary.
  • Among workers holding at least one side gig, 18% said they are doing so because it is considered standard in the modern workforce.
  • 25% of workers who have never before held a side gig say they are “extremely” or “very” likely to pick one up in the next year, with millennial workers leading the charge at 43%.
  • 65% of those who have never held a side gig said they have at least given it some thought.

The Spherion survey was conducted online in April 2017 with global market research organization Research Now.

The Bottom Line On Why You Can’t Fill Jobs

The Bottom Line On Why You Can't Fill JobsRoberta Matuson [COURTESY OF FORBES.COM]

As I travel around the country, here’s what I hear from employers:

• We can’t find talent.
• We can’t keep talent.
• We can’t keep talent engaged.

Here’s what I hear from those who are seeking employment:

• I can’t get past the Applicant Tracking Systems.
• I apply for jobs and never hear back.
• I’m perfectly qualified. I suspect my age is the problem.

The Bottom Line On Why You Can't Fill Jobs

From my perspective, there certainly is a disconnect. Here are the facts. Unemployment in the U.S. is 4.7%, which is down from last month’s figure of 5.0% and the new Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLT) report for April has just been released. There are now over 5.7 million job openings, which equals last July’s peak on records going back to 2001. This problem isn’t going away anytime soon.

Here’s why you can’t fill jobs and what you can do to change this.

You don’t know where you are going. I always tell my clients that we first have to establish where we are going before we can figure out how to get there. I use the example of someone in Detroit who is planning a trip. Is the goal to visit Canada, which is a stone’s throw away or is it to go to South America? Canada is an easy jaunt, that doesn’t even require packing a lunch. South America is quite a different story.

Decide where you are going in terms of your talent strategy, before mapping out your entire plan to get there. By doing so, you’ll be able to find a direct route that will get you to your destination in a timely and cost-efficient manner.

You’re too tentative. Have you ever been in a situation where someone really wanted you, more than anyone else? They may have wanted you for a particular role in their company or you may have been their first choice to take to the prom. In both cases, you were most likely pursued.

Hiring managers need to pursue talent the same way they would go after a ticket to a sold-out Bruce Springsteen show–with gusto! Do whatever is required to get the attention of the person you’ve identified as “the one” for your team. Don’t stop until you get a yes!

You’re focusing on the wrong things. I get how you want your applicant tracking system to completely integrate with your Human Resource Information System and you are investing heavily to make this so. However, given today’s unemployment and JOLT numbers, you’ve got bigger fish to fry.

Processes are not going to get your job filled. To do so, you need people who know how to attract and retain talent. This requires transforming your hiring managers into talent magnets. Doing so, will help you dramatically reduce the time it’s taking you to fill your current job openings.

Your applicant experience is dreadful. We always tell job candidates they only have one chance to make a great impression. Well, the same holds true for employers. I hear tons of horror stories from candidates regarding their experience with a company’s interviewing process. Many are relieved when they never hear back from the employer, as they can only imagine how awful it might be to work in this type of environment day in and day out.

Treat your applicants as well as you treat your customers and you’ll be golden.

Your hiring managers don’t know how to hire. Where is it written that upon promotion to management, you automatically acquire the assessing candidates gene that seems to be missing from many hiring managers? Most hiring managers have no idea how to hire. I can say this as I’ve taught thousands of hiring managers how to select for success. One such hiring manager comes to mind. She said the following to me after attending a course I facilitated on Selecting for Success. “I’ve been interviewing for years and now I finally know why I’ve been asking these questions!”

Now that I’ve exposed the real truth about hiring managers, it’s up to you to help these people dramatically improve their ability to select new hires. Believe me when I tell you that most will be eternally grateful that you are finally giving them support.

Stop eliminating candidates based on salary. Many companies toss out anyone who is asking for more money than we are willing to pay. This usually results in a huge chunk of the talent pool–those over the age of 40–being tossed out as well.

Take a few moments to have a conversation with a candidate before discarding them because of money. By doing so, you may find that many candidates are more flexible on salary than you had originally thought.

The Bottom Line On Why You Can't Fill Jobs

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

By Caitlin

[Courtesy of shared.com]

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

The best way to take charge of life is to clear away the mental clutter and get real. Whether you’re an over-thinker, an under-achiever or a worrywart, a no-nonsense approach to life is a great way to clean up your act.

As I child, I was always thinking: analyzing, criticizing everything to death. I assure you, it was an exhausting way to live – especially when trying to learn calculus. The BANE of my existence was math. I just could not do it. My problem? Over-thinking. Some of the best advice I ever received came from my science teacher – she said: Caitlin, simplify.

That’s it.

Now, I’m not a mathematician, or even a science major, but that single word changed the way I did math and eventually, the way I did life. It still took a few years of young 20s foolishness to figure how it worked for things like relationships, job interviews, negotiating that raise, or buying a car.

Now that I know the no-nonsense approach, I thought I’d share it with you. Remember, it’s not a cure-all. It’s just a perspective: a philosophy, a way to do life that seems to work. It’s what happens when you Simplify.

1. Do Not Be Deterred

There will be times when you want to quit, when others want you to quit. Don’t quit. Don’t even think about quitting.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

2. Be Confident In Yourself

That’s right, believe. Some days, you’ll have to pull a Wendy Darling and tell yourself “I believe, I believe, I believe” But, we promise, thought + action = results. Keep believing in No.1

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

3. Be Willing To Negotiate

Believing in yourself is important, but there is a difference between being confident and being cocky. Be willing to understand your limits, know what you’re worth and what you can ask for. When it comes to the various relationships we have – work, family, partners – approaching them with an open mind and a clear sense of self-worth is always in our best interest.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

4. Hustle

It’s true, nothing worth having is free. I mean really worth having. You’ve got to show up to every moment in life – the good, the bad and the ugly. A no-nonsense person doesn’t flake when the going gets tough, and they definitely don’t wait around for handouts. Roll up your sleeves, lend a hand, a shoulder to cry on. You’ve got to do good to get great, so commit to the kind of work it is going to take for you to succeed personally and professionally.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

5. Know What You Want And How To Get It

Make a list, a mind-map, a song, a drawing, a vision board. Whatever. Just figure out what it is you that you want, and then figure out how to get it. If you don’t know, ask someone who does. Talk with experts in your industry, speak to people have experience who can mentor you and point you in the right direction. Once you have a plan of action attack!

6. Be Aware Of The Bull

This one is pretty simple – be aware of the bull, yours and others. There are misguided beliefs we have about ourselves that hold us back, or delude us into making bad decisions. There are also people out there who will tell you what you want to hear – even if they have the best intentions for you, it may not be good for you in the long run. Learn how to recognize the truth and spot a lie.

7. Stop Doing What Doesn’t Work

They say that the definition of crazy is doing the same thing over and over while expecting different results. Listen, if something doesn’t work, don’t try to make it work. I’m not telling you to give up, what I’m saying here is: don’t repeat your mistakes. I know it’s easier said than done, but when you make a mistake, make note of it. Write it down – what did you do? Why didn’t it work?

Learn from it, figure out how you can do things differently, then do that.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

Life isn’t foolproof, we’re imperfect people doing our best to get this right – for ourselves, our children, our communities. So, take it all with a grain of salt. Approach this incredible gift with a sense of wonder, but handle the basics with no-nonsense.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

The War For Talent Is Over. This New War Will Replace It.

[Courtesy of forbes.com]

The War For Talent Is Over

William Vanderbloemen , CONTRIBUTOR

I cover topics about having a strong faith and building a business. The future doesn’t belong to the talented. It belongs to the cultured. Culture cannot be taught but competency can.

The War For Talent Is Over

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

The last three hires I’ve made at Vanderbloemen, I have passed on super competent candidates in favor of less “talented” people.

I couldn’t be happier with my choices.

Why? I’m convinced that culture trumps competency every single time. So I’ve focused my hiring on people who fit our culture. I’ve trusted that competency (read, talent) can largely be learned. So far, the theory is proving to be true.

In our work as an executive search firm, we are constantly asked about the “war for talent.” I read articles that bear titles like: “There aren’t enough people to go around,” or “The Coming Talent Crisis.” As the baby boomers age, we face the largest wave of retirement in US history. Smart people are noticing that. They’re also aware that there aren’t many people available in the next generation, and it’s causing a panic.

At the age of 31, I became a young leader of a large church, and I noticed this pattern right away. Over 90% of all pastors in my type of church were over 40. So I went after young pastors for our staff. I hired three that were the most talented guys I’d ever interviewed. But I failed to focus on cultural fit and failed to pay attention to developing a healthy culture. No matter how much talent I hired, it never seemed to work out. I should have paid more attention to building good culture and hiring around it.

Now that my team has completed over 10,000 face to face interviews, I’ve been watching the talent horizon for a long time. I agree, there’s a shortage coming. But talent won’t be the trump card for winning as an employee or employer in the long run.

The future doesn’t belong to the talented. It belongs to the cultured.

Leaders who know their company culture and hire around it will see far more dividends than those who hire just for talent. Similarly, people looking for their “dream job” will find it when they look for a company that they fit culturally rather than simply a company that has a high growth rate or even a better compensation package.

Culture trumps competency every single time. Why?

Culture cannot be taught but competency can. With the dawn of the digital age, we now live inside the largest library ever. Nearly everything can be learned online. Look no further than the popularity home improvement shows, the rise of shows that spot unspotted talent in a crowd like The Voice, or the vast surge of online courses that can be taken to learn a new skill. I saw an ad for an online cooking course designed for “The Single Vegan Dad Trying To Feed Kids On a Tight Budget!” Ten years ago, nobody even knew what “DIY” meant. Now, it’s a part of our vocabulary (if you don’t know what it is, then figure it out yourself…).

So if you’re looking for a leg up on the job hunt, or if you’re trying to hire for the future, focus on these questions:

  1. Does the workplace have a well articulated company culture? Far too many companies have “cultural values” listed somewhere on paper, but they are pabulum. They use words and phrases like, “We value excellence.” Who doesn’t? Instead, look for values that stand out and uniquely name the DNA of the company. One example is the Netflix Culture Deck. Another example is our company values at Vanderbloemen that our team crowdsourced and cemented together about four years ago. Company values shouldn’t be stashed away in a file somewhere. You should be able to spot them in the daily rhythms of the company.
  2. Does the job (if you’re searching) or the employee (if you’re hiring) operate with the “same kind of crazy” as you? The more I study companies and people, the more I’m realizing that we are all some form of crazy (starting with me and my strange journey to running my company). Admitting that is the first step toward finding people and a workplace that thrives. When we interview people for our team, we start with giving them a list of reasons they really don’t want to come work here, and we use our cultural values to frame those questions. For instance, we require a very high, almost OCD, obsession with quick responses to clients and candidate. It’s our value of “ridiculous responsiveness.” We say to interviewees, “If you like predictable, routine, easy to schedule work, please save yourself and leave the interview now. We’re not that, and you’ll probably think we are crazy.” This gives both our team and the candidates we’re interviewing a litmus test during the vetting process that can help us assess cultural match early on.
  3. Is the core competency of the job something that can be easily learned? Some things can be taught quickly. Other things, say brain surgery and rocket science, do take intensive training that cannot be overlooked. But my guess is that most jobs have a higher quotient of “learnability” than most people initially realize. While it might take ninety days for a person to fully develop a skill set, I believe a cultural match cannot be taught, no matter how long the person has to learn it.

Culture isn’t just a buzzword. It’s the new currency for both hiring the right people and finding your dream job.

Resume Not Getting Responses? Here’s What to Do

[Courtesy of Murray Resources]

Resume Not Getting Responses? Here’s What to Do

You only have a few seconds to make a positive impression on a hiring manager. It’s not a lot of time to stand out and get noticed. The good news is that just a few small tweaks can lead to big improvements on your resume. Here’s a look at 5 you can make right now:

#1: Stick to standard.

Unless you’re applying for a job in a creative field, don’t get flashy on your resume. Instead, format it in a traditional way, with bolded job titles and bullets underneath. In addition, when emailing your resume, always send a PDF. That way, the formatting will look the same regardless of the computer it’s being opened on. Also, stick to traditional fonts on your resume. Times New Roman, Helvetica, and Arial are always good choices.

#2: Keep it concise.

Get rid of unnecessary verbiage. This includes stating that “references are available on request.” In addition, don’t include more than six or seven bullets under each job title. And make sure each one is succinct and makes sense for the reader.

#3: Pull out that personal information.

Details such as your marital status, the number of kids you have, or your religion don’t belong on your resume. In fact, it’s illegal for an employer to consider these factors when hiring and including them makes you look out of the loop.

#4: Concentrate on accomplishments.

The single best way to get noticed by a hiring manager is to promote your proven track record. That means highlighting awards, successes, achievements, praise, and positive comments you’ve received over the years – and that are most relevant to the job you want. Add numbers and percentages to quantify accomplishments wherever you can.

#5: Phone a friend.

Once you’ve polished your resume and think it’s as good as it’s going to get, ask a friend or colleague to review it. Not only can they check for mistakes and typos, but they can also offer you some insight and inspiration into how to position your background.

Obvious signs your employee is looking for a new job

Obvious signs your employee is looking for a new job

Jane McNeill

Managing Director NSW & WA at Hays
[Courtesy of linkedin.com]

Every day, many people around the world make the brave and exciting decision to leave their current employer in pursuit of a new challenge. It’s an inevitable part of the world of work. However, despite this, hiring managers are often left in a state of shock or even panic when a member of their team hands in their notice unexpectedly.

So, as a hiring manager, what can you do to pre-empt this feeling and plan accordingly? From my experience, there are a number of signs which could indicate a member of your team may be looking elsewhere. As such, I’ve outlined a few of these below.

Admittedly, whilst these signs may not mean much in isolation of one another, I would say a combination of these behaviours is a strong indicator that a member of your staff is about to jump ship, and it’s time to start preparing.

1. They’re using their personal phone more often

If your employee is frequently disappearing outside to speak on their personal phone, or they seem to be using it more often than usual during work hours, then I would class this as one of the signs that they may be speaking to a recruiter or hiring manager. However, I do urge you not to jump to conclusions here – there may be something happening in their personal lives, which requires them to use their phone more. Just keep an eye on how often this happens, especially if it is affecting how productive they are being. And, this brings me onto my next point.

2. Their performance has slipped

Sometimes when an employee can see an end in sight, they tend to clock off mentally, which will inevitably impact on their performance and productivity. This will be evident in their level of involvement during meetings, and whether they seem to be paying less attention or contributing fewer ideas than before. You should also keep an eye on the quality and output of work they are producing.

3. Their attendance has dropped

Is your employee starting to get into the habit of leaving early or turning up late? Are they requesting random days off in the middle of the week at short notice? This is a common clue that they’re going to interviews.

4. They are acting non-committal

If this member of the team won’t commit to future projects or stays quiet during conversations surrounding these, I would suggest that this is because they know they won’t be there to see them through.

5. They are turning up to work looking smarter than usual

Your employee may be arriving to work dressed more formally than usual. If this is the case, then they may well have had an interview that morning, or will have one lined up for their lunch break or after work. This is more than likely to be the case if they normally turn up looking fairly casual.

6. They are more active on LinkedIn

Have you noticed this team member updating their profile, getting involved in more conversations, connecting with more people, and even asking for recommendations on LinkedIn? If so, chances are they are using LinkedIn as part of their job searching process. It’s just a shame that they don’t know how to keep their activity hidden from your news feed.

7. They are distancing themselves

If this employee is acting more distant, whether it’s avoiding work social occasions, or simply making less conversation with colleagues, then this could be an indication that they’re starting to disengage with the team, and almost starting to prepare to leave mentally. Again, this could be put down to their personal matters, so always check that everything is ok with this individual in terms of their wellbeing before you presume that their behavior is work related.

8. They recently asked for something (and didn’t get it)

Whether it’s a pay rise, promotion or training course, this employee, for whatever reason, may have just been refused one of their requests. This may have left a bitter taste in their mouth, and prompted them to look elsewhere. If any of the above behaviors follow a situation where they asked for something and didn’t get it, then I would say it’s safe to consider that this employee may be looking to leave.

Don’t jump to conclusions

Remember that the above signs are also an indication that this employee is simply unhappy, whether it’s personal or work-related, and are not looking for another job at all. You may just need to check in with them to get the full story and find out if there is anything you can do to help. If this conversation doesn’t provide any explanation as to why this employee is acting differently, and you still believe they are looking elsewhere, start to brace yourself practically (and emotionally) for the moment that resignation letter lands on your desk.

What next?

If this employee does decide to explore pastures new, then start working with an expert recruiter on your hiring strategy, from what the job description will include, to the types of questions you will ask.

Laid off? See Ways to Maintain a Positive Attitude During Job Search

By: Catherine Adenle
[Courtesy of articlesbase.com]

Laid Off See Ways To Maintaina Positive Attitude During Job Search

A major feature of unemployment is that it is another cross-road in your life and only you can choose which direction you take. There are very few opportunities like this in your life. Paradoxically, while you may not have chosen the redundancy or lay off situation, it has delivered the opportunity for you to now carefully choose your future direction. However, realizing this is crucial because you have to first maintain a positive mental attitude and use the same positive attitude to do a job search.

While maintaining a positive attitude is vital to a successful job search, there will be times when you get discouraged. It may seem impossible to revive that positive energy level. But there are many things you can do to bring your good outlook back to life and keep it in good shape.

Think of the following tips as a crash course in job search CPR – Cheerful, Positive, Resuscitation.

Remember to feel good about yourself.

This is a golden rule and the key to a positive attitude. Remember, all the points that follow this are ways of helping you feel good about yourself. Remember, no one else can feel good for you. Reach out to that wonderful place inside you where no one else has control over and bring it to the surface and let it radiate through your being.

Talk positively about yourself and your abilities.

Don’t talk yourself down. Be very positive about yourself, your skills and your achievements. You were not sacked, you were not made redundant, the position you were in was made redundant due to business refocus! Think about all your achievements in the past and be happy about them. Be proud of yourself and let it show in your talk, walk and the way you see life. What you call yourself is what people will call you. What you believe about yourself is the foundation of all your future actions.

Take total charge!

Only you can do it, roll up your sleeves, be ready to get your hands dirty and take charge. Be present, be visible, be accountable, stand out and be ready. Accept full responsibility for your life and your job search. It is not up to your partner, mother, father, girlfriend or boyfriend, or your aunt Tania in ‘God knows where’ to find you a job. Although it is important that you expand your circle of influence by networking like there is no tomorrow and your network will be a definite help, but YOU are responsible for the success of your job search so learn to be a superstar job seeker. If you don’t have a job, your current job is that of a Job Search Manager.

Let go of regrets about the past.

Move on, instead of blaming yourself or anybody and constantly rehashing past mistakes, take the opportunity to learn from the past. Build on past experiences to improve yourself and your abilities. Waste no time on unproductive thoughts and things. Be pragmatic and live in the present with a focus on a new beginning.

Attitude is contagious.

Surround yourself with supportive, positive people. Walk away from nay sayers, or emotional vampires. Don’t let them drain you of your positive energy.

Stop worrying about the future.

While you don’t want to live in the past, you also don’t want to live in the future. I know that worrying is a habit, get past it, you can change the habit if you really try. If you find yourself stuck in a negativity rut, shovel yourself out by focusing on your hopes and dreams rather than on your fears. Dust yourself off and put solutions in place to help you get to where you dream of.

Flatter yourself.

The job search period is no time to be humble. Make a list of every positive feedback that you ever received and why. Read every complimentary e-mail and things said about you that you can find. Letters of praise, past awards, performance appraisals, or any other positive recognitions you have are good ways to remind yourself of your worth and talents. Paste these things on a wall or a bulletin board in your work area at home to boost your spirits whenever you feel a little down.

Start each day on a positive, upbeat note.

Trust me, the start of your day will set the tempo for everything that follows. So it is important that you do something every morning that will put you in a good mood, whether that is taking a walk, walking your dog, listening to some upbeat music, twittering, blogging, running, surfing the Internet, doing a crossword, or just relaxing with a good cup of coffee or tea.

Get physical!

Don’t vegetate on a sofa with a remote in one hand and a pile of biscuits feeling sorry for yourself. You’ve heard the saying, “healthy body, healthy mind.” Keep yourself healthy and in good physical shape. This will boost your energy level and make it easier to maintain a positive mental attitude. Exercise regularly, eat a well-balanced diet, get enough sleep, chill out with positive friends and not the ones that will talk your emotions down. Turn the volume of your music up and dance but don’t disturb your neighbors!

Create a ‘job search’ schedule and stick to it.

Knowing what you are supposed to do each day can prevent you from feeling lost or bored. Sticking to your schedule as closely as possible will provide focus to your job search.

Keep up appearances

Turn your cool and professional swagger on. While nobody expects you to wear a suit and tie every day on your job search, try not to dress too casually. Keep your work space and living space neat and tidy. Set a positive framework for your job search.

Take a team approach to finding a job.

Even if the team is only two people, it is helpful to have somebody else to share ideas with and to review your progress on a regular basis. Talk to your former colleagues and share tips. Talk about what success will look like and how to get there. Go for a drink and discuss in a happy environment.

Accept your cycles.

While it is important to maintain a positive attitude, it’s unrealistic to think that you will be 100% positive forever. The trick is not to get down on yourself when you get down. Set a time limit on how long (10 minutes, for example) you will allow yourself to stay down when you feel a little depressed.

Join a professional group.

If you are looking for a job in a certain profession, join LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. ‘Follow’ the company, ‘friend’ them and ‘like’ their products. Comment on their recent developments and follow their news. However, be professional at all times. Joining an association can be an excellent way to keep up to date on developments and trends. It will help you develop your network and put you in contact with people that have interests similar to yours.

Keep growing.

Continue to develop your skills and knowledge while looking for work. Do this by:

1. Taking a class.

2. Attending free webinars

3. Taking part in Twitter (professional) chats

4. Attending conferences, workshops and seminars.

5. Reading pertinent articles on the web

6. Creating a blog of your own

7. Subscribing to RSS feeds

8. Subscribing to trade magazines.

9. Reading the newspaper and other current-affair magazines.

10. Doing volunteer work that uses the skills and knowledge you want to use in your next job.If you are not immediately successful in finding work, you might start to question your skills and qualifications. Keeping on top of the skills, knowledge and trends in your field will make you feel positive about your ability to do the type of work you want to do.

Don’t take rejections personally.

Very few people land the very first job they apply to or are interviewed for. Your attitude really depends on how you look at things. You can see a job rejection as a personal attack on your abilities or character, or you can see it as an opportunity to grow and learn more about yourself.