Interest In Side Gigs Escalates, Survey Finds

Recent survey shows that a large percentage of workers, 85%, work more than one job. Is that true for you?

[COURTESY OF STAFFINGINDUSTRY.COM]

INTEREST IN SIDE GIGS ESCALATES, SURVEY FINDS

A large percentage of workers, 85%, hold at least one side gig or secondary source of employment in addition to their primary job, according to a study commissioned by Spherion Staffing. Of that group, more than half, 54%, hold two or more side gigs, extending their skills across multiple roles and fields of work.

Interest In Side Gigs Escalates, Survey Finds

Among workers holding at least one side gig, a desire to supplement their current income and to make money to save for future interests and responsibilities were the most frequently cited reasons for doing so, at 42% and 37% respectively. In particular, 57% of female workers deemed income growth the main inspiration for their side-gig activity, far surpassing the 31% of male workers who said the same.

“The escalating interest in side gigs across the American workforce does not necessarily reflect that workers are unhappy with their job, but rather a desire to pursue new and exciting growth opportunities — be they financial or personal,” said Sandy Mazur, Spherion division president. “Given this growth, side gig flexibility must be taken into account as companies refine their recruitment and retention plans. Employers and employees must find a middle ground that gives workers freedom to explore supplemental opportunities without inhibiting productivity or performance.”

Additional findings from the survey include:

  • Nearly half of workers surveyed, 47%, said that changing societal norms have set the expectation that at least one side gig is necessary.
  • Among workers holding at least one side gig, 18% said they are doing so because it is considered standard in the modern workforce.
  • 25% of workers who have never before held a side gig say they are “extremely” or “very” likely to pick one up in the next year, with millennial workers leading the charge at 43%.
  • 65% of those who have never held a side gig said they have at least given it some thought.

The Spherion survey was conducted online in April 2017 with global market research organization Research Now.

The Bottom Line On Why You Can’t Fill Jobs

The Bottom Line On Why You Can't Fill JobsRoberta Matuson [COURTESY OF FORBES.COM]

As I travel around the country, here’s what I hear from employers:

• We can’t find talent.
• We can’t keep talent.
• We can’t keep talent engaged.

Here’s what I hear from those who are seeking employment:

• I can’t get past the Applicant Tracking Systems.
• I apply for jobs and never hear back.
• I’m perfectly qualified. I suspect my age is the problem.

The Bottom Line On Why You Can't Fill Jobs

From my perspective, there certainly is a disconnect. Here are the facts. Unemployment in the U.S. is 4.7%, which is down from last month’s figure of 5.0% and the new Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLT) report for April has just been released. There are now over 5.7 million job openings, which equals last July’s peak on records going back to 2001. This problem isn’t going away anytime soon.

Here’s why you can’t fill jobs and what you can do to change this.

You don’t know where you are going. I always tell my clients that we first have to establish where we are going before we can figure out how to get there. I use the example of someone in Detroit who is planning a trip. Is the goal to visit Canada, which is a stone’s throw away or is it to go to South America? Canada is an easy jaunt, that doesn’t even require packing a lunch. South America is quite a different story.

Decide where you are going in terms of your talent strategy, before mapping out your entire plan to get there. By doing so, you’ll be able to find a direct route that will get you to your destination in a timely and cost-efficient manner.

You’re too tentative. Have you ever been in a situation where someone really wanted you, more than anyone else? They may have wanted you for a particular role in their company or you may have been their first choice to take to the prom. In both cases, you were most likely pursued.

Hiring managers need to pursue talent the same way they would go after a ticket to a sold-out Bruce Springsteen show–with gusto! Do whatever is required to get the attention of the person you’ve identified as “the one” for your team. Don’t stop until you get a yes!

You’re focusing on the wrong things. I get how you want your applicant tracking system to completely integrate with your Human Resource Information System and you are investing heavily to make this so. However, given today’s unemployment and JOLT numbers, you’ve got bigger fish to fry.

Processes are not going to get your job filled. To do so, you need people who know how to attract and retain talent. This requires transforming your hiring managers into talent magnets. Doing so, will help you dramatically reduce the time it’s taking you to fill your current job openings.

Your applicant experience is dreadful. We always tell job candidates they only have one chance to make a great impression. Well, the same holds true for employers. I hear tons of horror stories from candidates regarding their experience with a company’s interviewing process. Many are relieved when they never hear back from the employer, as they can only imagine how awful it might be to work in this type of environment day in and day out.

Treat your applicants as well as you treat your customers and you’ll be golden.

Your hiring managers don’t know how to hire. Where is it written that upon promotion to management, you automatically acquire the assessing candidates gene that seems to be missing from many hiring managers? Most hiring managers have no idea how to hire. I can say this as I’ve taught thousands of hiring managers how to select for success. One such hiring manager comes to mind. She said the following to me after attending a course I facilitated on Selecting for Success. “I’ve been interviewing for years and now I finally know why I’ve been asking these questions!”

Now that I’ve exposed the real truth about hiring managers, it’s up to you to help these people dramatically improve their ability to select new hires. Believe me when I tell you that most will be eternally grateful that you are finally giving them support.

Stop eliminating candidates based on salary. Many companies toss out anyone who is asking for more money than we are willing to pay. This usually results in a huge chunk of the talent pool–those over the age of 40–being tossed out as well.

Take a few moments to have a conversation with a candidate before discarding them because of money. By doing so, you may find that many candidates are more flexible on salary than you had originally thought.

The Bottom Line On Why You Can't Fill Jobs

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

By Caitlin

[Courtesy of shared.com]

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

The best way to take charge of life is to clear away the mental clutter and get real. Whether you’re an over-thinker, an under-achiever or a worrywart, a no-nonsense approach to life is a great way to clean up your act.

As I child, I was always thinking: analyzing, criticizing everything to death. I assure you, it was an exhausting way to live – especially when trying to learn calculus. The BANE of my existence was math. I just could not do it. My problem? Over-thinking. Some of the best advice I ever received came from my science teacher – she said: Caitlin, simplify.

That’s it.

Now, I’m not a mathematician, or even a science major, but that single word changed the way I did math and eventually, the way I did life. It still took a few years of young 20s foolishness to figure how it worked for things like relationships, job interviews, negotiating that raise, or buying a car.

Now that I know the no-nonsense approach, I thought I’d share it with you. Remember, it’s not a cure-all. It’s just a perspective: a philosophy, a way to do life that seems to work. It’s what happens when you Simplify.

1. Do Not Be Deterred

There will be times when you want to quit, when others want you to quit. Don’t quit. Don’t even think about quitting.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

2. Be Confident In Yourself

That’s right, believe. Some days, you’ll have to pull a Wendy Darling and tell yourself “I believe, I believe, I believe” But, we promise, thought + action = results. Keep believing in No.1

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

3. Be Willing To Negotiate

Believing in yourself is important, but there is a difference between being confident and being cocky. Be willing to understand your limits, know what you’re worth and what you can ask for. When it comes to the various relationships we have – work, family, partners – approaching them with an open mind and a clear sense of self-worth is always in our best interest.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

4. Hustle

It’s true, nothing worth having is free. I mean really worth having. You’ve got to show up to every moment in life – the good, the bad and the ugly. A no-nonsense person doesn’t flake when the going gets tough, and they definitely don’t wait around for handouts. Roll up your sleeves, lend a hand, a shoulder to cry on. You’ve got to do good to get great, so commit to the kind of work it is going to take for you to succeed personally and professionally.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

5. Know What You Want And How To Get It

Make a list, a mind-map, a song, a drawing, a vision board. Whatever. Just figure out what it is you that you want, and then figure out how to get it. If you don’t know, ask someone who does. Talk with experts in your industry, speak to people have experience who can mentor you and point you in the right direction. Once you have a plan of action attack!

6. Be Aware Of The Bull

This one is pretty simple – be aware of the bull, yours and others. There are misguided beliefs we have about ourselves that hold us back, or delude us into making bad decisions. There are also people out there who will tell you what you want to hear – even if they have the best intentions for you, it may not be good for you in the long run. Learn how to recognize the truth and spot a lie.

7. Stop Doing What Doesn’t Work

They say that the definition of crazy is doing the same thing over and over while expecting different results. Listen, if something doesn’t work, don’t try to make it work. I’m not telling you to give up, what I’m saying here is: don’t repeat your mistakes. I know it’s easier said than done, but when you make a mistake, make note of it. Write it down – what did you do? Why didn’t it work?

Learn from it, figure out how you can do things differently, then do that.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

Life isn’t foolproof, we’re imperfect people doing our best to get this right – for ourselves, our children, our communities. So, take it all with a grain of salt. Approach this incredible gift with a sense of wonder, but handle the basics with no-nonsense.

No Nonsense Rules To Live By

The War For Talent Is Over. This New War Will Replace It.

[Courtesy of forbes.com]

The War For Talent Is Over

William Vanderbloemen , CONTRIBUTOR

I cover topics about having a strong faith and building a business. The future doesn’t belong to the talented. It belongs to the cultured. Culture cannot be taught but competency can.

The War For Talent Is Over

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

The last three hires I’ve made at Vanderbloemen, I have passed on super competent candidates in favor of less “talented” people.

I couldn’t be happier with my choices.

Why? I’m convinced that culture trumps competency every single time. So I’ve focused my hiring on people who fit our culture. I’ve trusted that competency (read, talent) can largely be learned. So far, the theory is proving to be true.

In our work as an executive search firm, we are constantly asked about the “war for talent.” I read articles that bear titles like: “There aren’t enough people to go around,” or “The Coming Talent Crisis.” As the baby boomers age, we face the largest wave of retirement in US history. Smart people are noticing that. They’re also aware that there aren’t many people available in the next generation, and it’s causing a panic.

At the age of 31, I became a young leader of a large church, and I noticed this pattern right away. Over 90% of all pastors in my type of church were over 40. So I went after young pastors for our staff. I hired three that were the most talented guys I’d ever interviewed. But I failed to focus on cultural fit and failed to pay attention to developing a healthy culture. No matter how much talent I hired, it never seemed to work out. I should have paid more attention to building good culture and hiring around it.

Now that my team has completed over 10,000 face to face interviews, I’ve been watching the talent horizon for a long time. I agree, there’s a shortage coming. But talent won’t be the trump card for winning as an employee or employer in the long run.

The future doesn’t belong to the talented. It belongs to the cultured.

Leaders who know their company culture and hire around it will see far more dividends than those who hire just for talent. Similarly, people looking for their “dream job” will find it when they look for a company that they fit culturally rather than simply a company that has a high growth rate or even a better compensation package.

Culture trumps competency every single time. Why?

Culture cannot be taught but competency can. With the dawn of the digital age, we now live inside the largest library ever. Nearly everything can be learned online. Look no further than the popularity home improvement shows, the rise of shows that spot unspotted talent in a crowd like The Voice, or the vast surge of online courses that can be taken to learn a new skill. I saw an ad for an online cooking course designed for “The Single Vegan Dad Trying To Feed Kids On a Tight Budget!” Ten years ago, nobody even knew what “DIY” meant. Now, it’s a part of our vocabulary (if you don’t know what it is, then figure it out yourself…).

So if you’re looking for a leg up on the job hunt, or if you’re trying to hire for the future, focus on these questions:

  1. Does the workplace have a well articulated company culture? Far too many companies have “cultural values” listed somewhere on paper, but they are pabulum. They use words and phrases like, “We value excellence.” Who doesn’t? Instead, look for values that stand out and uniquely name the DNA of the company. One example is the Netflix Culture Deck. Another example is our company values at Vanderbloemen that our team crowdsourced and cemented together about four years ago. Company values shouldn’t be stashed away in a file somewhere. You should be able to spot them in the daily rhythms of the company.
  2. Does the job (if you’re searching) or the employee (if you’re hiring) operate with the “same kind of crazy” as you? The more I study companies and people, the more I’m realizing that we are all some form of crazy (starting with me and my strange journey to running my company). Admitting that is the first step toward finding people and a workplace that thrives. When we interview people for our team, we start with giving them a list of reasons they really don’t want to come work here, and we use our cultural values to frame those questions. For instance, we require a very high, almost OCD, obsession with quick responses to clients and candidate. It’s our value of “ridiculous responsiveness.” We say to interviewees, “If you like predictable, routine, easy to schedule work, please save yourself and leave the interview now. We’re not that, and you’ll probably think we are crazy.” This gives both our team and the candidates we’re interviewing a litmus test during the vetting process that can help us assess cultural match early on.
  3. Is the core competency of the job something that can be easily learned? Some things can be taught quickly. Other things, say brain surgery and rocket science, do take intensive training that cannot be overlooked. But my guess is that most jobs have a higher quotient of “learnability” than most people initially realize. While it might take ninety days for a person to fully develop a skill set, I believe a cultural match cannot be taught, no matter how long the person has to learn it.

Culture isn’t just a buzzword. It’s the new currency for both hiring the right people and finding your dream job.

Laid off? See Ways to Maintain a Positive Attitude During Job Search

By: Catherine Adenle
[Courtesy of articlesbase.com]

Laid Off See Ways To Maintaina Positive Attitude During Job Search

A major feature of unemployment is that it is another cross-road in your life and only you can choose which direction you take. There are very few opportunities like this in your life. Paradoxically, while you may not have chosen the redundancy or lay off situation, it has delivered the opportunity for you to now carefully choose your future direction. However, realizing this is crucial because you have to first maintain a positive mental attitude and use the same positive attitude to do a job search.

While maintaining a positive attitude is vital to a successful job search, there will be times when you get discouraged. It may seem impossible to revive that positive energy level. But there are many things you can do to bring your good outlook back to life and keep it in good shape.

Think of the following tips as a crash course in job search CPR – Cheerful, Positive, Resuscitation.

Remember to feel good about yourself.

This is a golden rule and the key to a positive attitude. Remember, all the points that follow this are ways of helping you feel good about yourself. Remember, no one else can feel good for you. Reach out to that wonderful place inside you where no one else has control over and bring it to the surface and let it radiate through your being.

Talk positively about yourself and your abilities.

Don’t talk yourself down. Be very positive about yourself, your skills and your achievements. You were not sacked, you were not made redundant, the position you were in was made redundant due to business refocus! Think about all your achievements in the past and be happy about them. Be proud of yourself and let it show in your talk, walk and the way you see life. What you call yourself is what people will call you. What you believe about yourself is the foundation of all your future actions.

Take total charge!

Only you can do it, roll up your sleeves, be ready to get your hands dirty and take charge. Be present, be visible, be accountable, stand out and be ready. Accept full responsibility for your life and your job search. It is not up to your partner, mother, father, girlfriend or boyfriend, or your aunt Tania in ‘God knows where’ to find you a job. Although it is important that you expand your circle of influence by networking like there is no tomorrow and your network will be a definite help, but YOU are responsible for the success of your job search so learn to be a superstar job seeker. If you don’t have a job, your current job is that of a Job Search Manager.

Let go of regrets about the past.

Move on, instead of blaming yourself or anybody and constantly rehashing past mistakes, take the opportunity to learn from the past. Build on past experiences to improve yourself and your abilities. Waste no time on unproductive thoughts and things. Be pragmatic and live in the present with a focus on a new beginning.

Attitude is contagious.

Surround yourself with supportive, positive people. Walk away from nay sayers, or emotional vampires. Don’t let them drain you of your positive energy.

Stop worrying about the future.

While you don’t want to live in the past, you also don’t want to live in the future. I know that worrying is a habit, get past it, you can change the habit if you really try. If you find yourself stuck in a negativity rut, shovel yourself out by focusing on your hopes and dreams rather than on your fears. Dust yourself off and put solutions in place to help you get to where you dream of.

Flatter yourself.

The job search period is no time to be humble. Make a list of every positive feedback that you ever received and why. Read every complimentary e-mail and things said about you that you can find. Letters of praise, past awards, performance appraisals, or any other positive recognitions you have are good ways to remind yourself of your worth and talents. Paste these things on a wall or a bulletin board in your work area at home to boost your spirits whenever you feel a little down.

Start each day on a positive, upbeat note.

Trust me, the start of your day will set the tempo for everything that follows. So it is important that you do something every morning that will put you in a good mood, whether that is taking a walk, walking your dog, listening to some upbeat music, twittering, blogging, running, surfing the Internet, doing a crossword, or just relaxing with a good cup of coffee or tea.

Get physical!

Don’t vegetate on a sofa with a remote in one hand and a pile of biscuits feeling sorry for yourself. You’ve heard the saying, “healthy body, healthy mind.” Keep yourself healthy and in good physical shape. This will boost your energy level and make it easier to maintain a positive mental attitude. Exercise regularly, eat a well-balanced diet, get enough sleep, chill out with positive friends and not the ones that will talk your emotions down. Turn the volume of your music up and dance but don’t disturb your neighbors!

Create a ‘job search’ schedule and stick to it.

Knowing what you are supposed to do each day can prevent you from feeling lost or bored. Sticking to your schedule as closely as possible will provide focus to your job search.

Keep up appearances

Turn your cool and professional swagger on. While nobody expects you to wear a suit and tie every day on your job search, try not to dress too casually. Keep your work space and living space neat and tidy. Set a positive framework for your job search.

Take a team approach to finding a job.

Even if the team is only two people, it is helpful to have somebody else to share ideas with and to review your progress on a regular basis. Talk to your former colleagues and share tips. Talk about what success will look like and how to get there. Go for a drink and discuss in a happy environment.

Accept your cycles.

While it is important to maintain a positive attitude, it’s unrealistic to think that you will be 100% positive forever. The trick is not to get down on yourself when you get down. Set a time limit on how long (10 minutes, for example) you will allow yourself to stay down when you feel a little depressed.

Join a professional group.

If you are looking for a job in a certain profession, join LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. ‘Follow’ the company, ‘friend’ them and ‘like’ their products. Comment on their recent developments and follow their news. However, be professional at all times. Joining an association can be an excellent way to keep up to date on developments and trends. It will help you develop your network and put you in contact with people that have interests similar to yours.

Keep growing.

Continue to develop your skills and knowledge while looking for work. Do this by:

1. Taking a class.

2. Attending free webinars

3. Taking part in Twitter (professional) chats

4. Attending conferences, workshops and seminars.

5. Reading pertinent articles on the web

6. Creating a blog of your own

7. Subscribing to RSS feeds

8. Subscribing to trade magazines.

9. Reading the newspaper and other current-affair magazines.

10. Doing volunteer work that uses the skills and knowledge you want to use in your next job.If you are not immediately successful in finding work, you might start to question your skills and qualifications. Keeping on top of the skills, knowledge and trends in your field will make you feel positive about your ability to do the type of work you want to do.

Don’t take rejections personally.

Very few people land the very first job they apply to or are interviewed for. Your attitude really depends on how you look at things. You can see a job rejection as a personal attack on your abilities or character, or you can see it as an opportunity to grow and learn more about yourself.

Reasons to Use Social Media in Your Job Search

By Catherine Conlan

[Courtesy of Monster.com]

Reasons to Use Social Media in Your Job Search

Using social media is a great way to boost your job search. Taking advantage of social media sites can help you get your name out there and find the job you’re looking for.

Here are four reasons to use social media in your job search.

You Can Become an Expert

Demonstrating a deeper knowledge about the industry you’re in — or would like to be in — through blogging builds your credibility, says Lisa Parkin, CEO of social media consultancy Social Climber. “Whether it’s on a personal website or on a dedicated blog about the industry they’re seeking employment in, job hunters can show potential employers their knowledge and skill sets by writing about a news event or relevant topic once or twice a week.”

It Shows You’re Not Afraid of Technology

You don’t have to be an expert, but having a social media presence shows you care about your professional reputation and you’re comfortable using technology, says Brie Weiler Reynolds, director of online content at FlexJobs.

Pinterest is a good site to try something innovative with your job search, she says. “Create a board for your resume where you pin pictures of your work experience and education such as pictures of the college you attended, the companies you’ve worked for, and so on. Pinterest is especially interesting because it helps you create a visual out of your resume, which is traditionally a text document.”

You Can Blog Your Way to a Job

Commenting on the issues in your industry or field of work can itself be a path to a new job. Michelle Bramer, marketing and PR manager for online advertising firm eZanga.com, says blogs are an excellent resource for job candidates looking for new opportunities. And linking back to your blog while posting on other sites can lead recruiters right to your virtual door.

“Some of my favorite bloggers are small companies, and surprisingly, many of them are always looking for marketing and sales support,” Bramer says. If you’ve blogged about a company before, it can help strengthen your pitch when you apply there. As someone who routinely manages content writers and PR specialists, she says, “some of our best writers have been found by forging a relationship on a social network.”

You Can Learn About a Company’s Culture

Social media can go both ways — you can tell hiring managers about yourself, but you can also use it to learn about companies you’re interested in. Following a company on social media can give you an inside look into a its culture, clients and work, says Lauren Maiman, owner of the Midnight Oil Group.

“Use that info to your advantage when it comes to a cover letter or interview,” she says. “Use this insight to make sure you mesh with and want to be a part of their team. If you’re connecting in a meaningful way with them on social media, by the time you get to the interview, they should feel like they already know you (so careful what info you put out there, too).”

Skills Recent Graduates Bring to the Workforce

by Ed Kavanagh

[Courtesy of www.thestaffingstream.com]

Skills Recent Graduates Bring to the Workforce

While May still seems far away, graduation season is fast approaching. So, do not be surprised if you soon see an influx in applications from college graduates as graduates are beginning to look for employment opportunities earlier and earlier. As an entirely new class of graduates seeks positions, companies can expect entirely new skillsets to enter the workforce.
A blurry line separates Millennials and Generation Z, but there is no doubt each group brings distinct sensibilities to the workplace. For example, Gen Z grew up during an economic downturn, watching their parents struggle to keep jobs and witnessing global instability via war and terror. This backdrop created a more money-cautious and pragmatic generation, a stark contrast to the typically optimistic and risk-seeking Millennials. As a result, Gen Z is eager to begin working, especially because they understand the volatility of the job market.
As Gen Z gets thrown into the professional mix with Baby Boomers, Gen X and Millennials, Addison Group shares some of the skills they will bring to the table:

• Social media savvy: The importance of social media is growing in every industry, and it’s long been a critical element of the recruiting process. Studies show that not only are 80 percent of Gen Z on social media daily, but also that same percentage consider creative self-expression important. Take advantage of these new workers’ fluency in the fast-changing landscape of social media and their ability to act as influencers to their peers. It could lead to increased intelligence within your digital or social teams internally and recruiting opportunities or brand reputation externally.

• Entrepreneurial spirit: Starting at a younger age, Gen Z desires to work independently, contribute to future technologies and make the world a better place via innovation. In fact, 72 percent of high school students said they want to start a business someday, and another 40 percent believe they will invent something that changes the world. Employers can take advantage of this entrepreneurial drive by encouraging newly graduated employees to work independently and contribute constructive criticism or new ideas that company veterans may be too engrained in the organization to see.

• Diversity and global awareness: A Ford study found that 58 percent of adults ages 35-plus worldwide agree that kids today have more in common with their global peers than they do with adults in their own country. Gen Z graduates will not only look for companies that contain a diverse set of employees, but they will feel comfortable functioning in a global corporate environment. From day one, offer these new hires a chance to work with your global offices, clients or partners. They will likely thrive in this setting and could open doors to more global opportunities.

• Money is not the motivator: Only 28 percent of Gen Z said money would motivate them to work harder and stay with their employer longer; this is a significantly smaller percentage compared to 42 percent of Gen Y. What does this mean for your company? You’ll attract talent based on passion rather than compensation. Use this to your advantage while recruiting, highlighting some of the community involvement and mission based work of your clients. Typically, people who are passionate about their company will do good work.

There is no doubt that integrating new generations into the workforce comes with new challenges, such as how to foster inter-generational collaboration. For example, older generations may find it difficult to work with new hires who embrace complicated technologies, or younger generations may not understand why seasoned professionals favor those with advanced degrees. However, the best way to prepare for these changes requires identifying the areas where newcomers will thrive and determining clear opportunities to capitalize on those skills.

3 Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm in your Job Search

By Debra Auerbach

[Courtesy of Career Builder.com]

3 Benefits to Using a Staffing Firm In Your Job Search

THREE KEY ADVANTAGES OF USING A STAFFING FIRM ARE EXPERIENCE, INSIGHTS AND CONFIDENTIAL OPPORTUNITIES.

Sometimes a job search can feel isolating. You’re spending hours upon hours searching for opportunities, working on your resume and applying to job openings, often without having any outside feedback about what you’re doing right or wrong. That isolation can add a lot of emotional stress to an already nerve-wracking experience.

What you may not realize is that you don’t have to go it alone. “Psychologists tell us that next to death of a spouse, death of a child and death of a parent, the fourth most emotional experience we have, coupled with divorce, is searching for a job. It is emotionally stressful,” says Tony Beshara, owner and president of Babich & Associates, the oldest placement and recruitment service in Texas. “A professional staffing firm can help eliminate that emotional stress. Staffing firms are in the trenches on a daily basis with candidates and employers.”

Beshara says the three key advantages of using a staffing firm are experience, insights and confidential opportunities. Read on to learn more about these benefits and how staffing firms can play a crucial role in helping you find your next career:

1. Experience 

According to Beshara, the average U.S. professional changes jobs every two and a half to three years. So that means a worker may go a long stretch of time before needing to engage in a job search. Staffing firm recruiters, on the other hand, live and breathe the job-search process daily.

Beshara points out that within the period of time between job searches, the job market can change – sometimes drastically. “The staffing professional is current on exactly what is going on in the immediate market. They have a unique perspective that the job seeker will not have. The market for a particular skill or experience is never the same as it was three years ago. It isn’t likely any job candidate is going to be aware of that change. So, the ‘new’ candidate may think that finding a job is going to be like ‘last time,’ but it’s not.”

A knowledgeable staffing professional can help navigate a job seeker through the market changes, so the job seeker is less likely to encounter any surprises or challenges along the way. “The experienced staffing pro doesn’t give theoretical or abstract advice, but practical ‘this is the way it is … this is what you should expect … this is what we should do’ advice,” Beshara says.

2. Insights 

One of the often frustrating parts about job searching is not getting any feedback from employers as to why you aren’t the right fit for a role. When working with a staffing firm, you get access to that kind of information, which can help improve your search now and down the line.

“Staffing professionals have insights that candidates can’t get anywhere else,” Beshara says. “Since the majority of us work the same clients and the same hiring mangers over many years, we know what they like and how they like it, what they will hire and what they won’t. Since we get to know them personally, we not only understand the job they are trying to fill but we know their personalities and personal likes and dislikes. We give those insights to our candidates to be sure both parties have the best chance of success not in just getting a job, but [in having] a long, solid employment relationship.”

3. Confidential opportunities 

According to a 2014 study conducted by CareerBuilder and Inavero, the attribute job seekers value the most in staffing sales representatives or recruiters is that they can find opportunities job seekers wouldn’t be able to find themselves. Not only is that because staffing professionals are skilled at knowing which jobs might be the right fit, but it’s also because they are privy to opportunities that job seekers wouldn’t normally have access to.

“Because our clients trust us, they come to us with confidential job opportunities before they go to the general market,” Beshara says. “We have access to the ‘hidden’ job market. Hiring authorities will often ask us to fill positions that even people in their own organization don’t know about.”

Sometimes, there doesn’t even need to be a job opening for a staffing firm to get you a job. “Again, because of trust and insight, we know the kinds of employers that are interested in certain types of experience, whether or not they are ‘actively looking’ for a candidate,” Beshara notes. “One-third of the positions we fill don’t exist before we call a hiring authority representing a candidate we know they would be interested in speaking with. Employers will hire exceptional candidates when they come along even if they don’t have a formal opening. A good staffing professional knows his or her hiring authorities well enough to know the kind of candidate they’d be interested in even if they aren’t formally ‘looking.'”

The #1 Secret to Better Hiring in 2017

[Courtesy of Murray Resources]

The #1 Secret to Better Hiring in 2017

Hiring is now a whole lot harder for employers and easier for candidates. Unemployment is at 4.2% in Tyler. So, it’s not a buyer’s market anymore and candidates have more opportunities to consider. As a hiring manager or employer, what can you do? The answer’s easier than you might think: bring in the experts.

Here’s how a staffing agency can help you:

#1: They have in-depth knowledge of the candidate market.
While you might only hire a few times a year, recruiters at staffing agencies are constantly networking, sourcing candidates and hiring them – all year round. As a result, they know what kind of talent is available, how to best attract and recruit the best professionals, and what competitive compensation you should be offering them. This insight and information will help you recruit better candidates, faster.

#2: They can recruit hard-to-find or specialized talent.
Hiring today is challenging enough. But when it comes to a demanding position that requires hard-to-find skills, it can seem almost impossible to fill. But recruiters at a staffing agency know how to source active and passive candidates who are more selective about opportunities. They spend a lot of time recruiting top talent, including those with specialized skills, so you can leverage their network to find people with the background you need.

#3: They can speed up the hiring process.
When you’re inundated with resumes and cover letters, it can be hard to properly screen every candidate and also get your daily work done. But a recruiter at a staffing agency is trained to screen resumes and hone in on the skills you’re looking for. Not only that, but they can conduct phone screens and interviews to further qualify candidates. That way, the candidates you do end up seeing are those who are all a good fit for the job you’re offering.

#4: They can help you create a strong employer brand.
Your reputation in the candidate marketplace can have a big impact on the quality of talent you’re able to attract. A good staffing agency partner can help you develop an appealing employer brand. They’ll know where to advertise your company and openings, and how to position you as an employer of choice, including what it’s like to work at your organization, including culture, as well as perks and benefits.

If you need to hire – but are hard-pressed for time or resources – consider outsourcing the recruiting process to professionals who do it all day. You can benefit from the reach, network, and proven processes of a trusted staffing agency partner.

6 Easy Ways to Update Your Resume

Courtesy of Murray Resources

6 Easy Ways to Update Your Resume

You want to find a new job. But when’s the last time you looked at your resume?

If the answer is “a few years ago,” or worse, “I don’t remember,” then you have some work to do before you can submit it to potential employers. A great resume is like a ticket into the interview process. And if you don’t have one, then you’re going to miss out on top opportunities.

To help you in the process, here are six easy ways to update your resume:

#1: Think about goals.

While your resume gives an overview of your career history, it should also be about future goals. That means when you’re thinking about what to highlight, consider it through the lens of where you want to go in your career. If job duties at a past position don’t align with future career goals, then don’t put a lot of emphasis on them. Concentrate your attention, instead, on the experiences and credentials that relate to your current career objectives.

#2: Eliminate the objective.

Unless you’re changing careers, get rid of the objective, or make it very short. This simply takes up valuable space without offering a lot of return. Instead, replace it with a summary of qualifications that offers a few key highlights of your professional career.

#3: Focus on the “wow” factor.

The strongest resumes promote results, not just duties and responsibilities. Some questions to ask yourself to find your “wow” factor for each position include:

  • What have you been best at in past positions?
  • What accomplishment(s) are you most proud of?
  • Which achievements can you back up with numbers, dollars, and percentages?
  • What information would make a hiring manager want to call you in for an interview?

#4: Refresh the look.

Most hiring managers scan resumes. So make yours easy to quickly skim. Use bolded job titles and three to four bullet points under each. Also, don’t use a tiny point size for your font; 11 or 12 are standard. In addition, make sure there’s plenty of spacing so your resume doesn’t look cramped.

#5: Update your contact information.

If you just have your name and address, it’s time for an update. Your cell phone number and email, as well as a link to your LinkedIn profile, should be front and center instead.

#6: Use keywords.

Most companies today use an applicant tracking system to find candidates. So if you don’t use keywords from the job posting, you could get filtered out – even if you’re the right fit.